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BASELINE PAIN AND PATIENT BELIEF THAT PAIN WILL PERSIST MAY PREDICT LONGER-TERM OUTCOMES

BASELINE PAIN AND PATIENT BELIEF THAT PAIN WILL PERSIST MAY PREDICT LONGER-TERM OUTCOMES

A study published in the August issue of the Journal of Pain suggests that the intensity of low back pain (LBP) at onset may be predictive of pain and disability at 5-year follow-up. The research team analysed 488 patients who had consulted their physician about LBP. They found that baseline pain intensity was associated with a 12 percent increase in risk for poor outcome at 6 months, and that patients' belief that their LBP would persist was linked to a 4 percent increase in risk for poor outcome at 6 months. At 5 years, outcomes were best predicted by a model with the same factors as in the 6-month model: pain intensity increased risk by 9 percent, and a belief that LBP would persist increased risk by 6 percent.