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PREDICTORS OF OUTCOMES OF RECOVERY FOLLOWING TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT SURGERY

PREDICTORS OF OUTCOMES OF RECOVERY FOLLOWING TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT SURGERY

A recent paper by McHugh et al., published in The Bone and Joint Research Journal has investigated psychosocial and biomedical outcomes following total hip replacement (THR) and identified predictors of recovery from THR.

 Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) on the waiting list for primary THR in North West England were assessed pre-operatively and at six and 12 months post-operatively to investigate psychosocial and biomedical outcomes. Psychosocial outcomes were anxiety and depression, social support and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Biomedical outcomes were pain, physical function and stiffness. The primary outcome was the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey Total Physical Function. Potential predictors of outcome were age, sex, body mass index, previous joint replacement, involvement in the decision for THR, any comorbidities, any complications, type of medication, and pre-operative ENRICHD Social Support Instrument score, Hospital Anxiety and Depression scores and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index score.

 The study included 206 patients undergoing THR. There were 88 men and 118 women with a mean age of 66.3 years (SD 10.4;36 to 89). Pain, stiffness and physical function, severity of OA, HRQoL, anxiety and depression all improved significantly from preoperative to 12-month assessment (all p < 0.001), with the greatest improvement occurring in the first six months (all p < 0.001). The predictors that were found to influence recovery six months after THR were: pain (p < 0.001), anxiety (p = 0.034), depression (p = 0.001), previous joint replacement (p = 0.006) and anti-inflammatory drugs (p = 0.012).

The study identified the key psychosocial and biomedical predictors of recovery following THR. Identifying these predictors should help to identify and provide more support for patients at risk of poor recovery following THR.